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Illinois hunting and fishing

Tales from the Timber: Osborne

February 17, 2009 at 03:36 AM

I went coyote hunting in Moultrie County in early February and suffered some rude treatment by a critter.

First I caught one coyote flat-footed standing on some ice in the middle of a pond, but because they were replacing a roof nearby I couldn’t take a shot. That was at about 2 p.m.

Then I called in another, but he came in from downwind and took off before I saw him. He must have smelled me.

While that was a little frustrating, I was really insulted later when I talk a walk along the creek. I walked up on a coyote I had killed in December and saw his rear leg moving.

To see what made the leg move, I sneaked toward the coyote’s corpse. I wish I had my camera out quicker. Because what I saw was an opossum completely inside of the coyote, eating away.

Now you would think anything eating inside of a coyote that had been dead for two months would not have much of a sense of smell. But when I got close enough, the opossum backed out, stuck his nose in the air, sniffed a few times and then ran away.

I take a bath every day. Really.

Illinois hunting and fishing

EDITOR'S NOTE: Look for Tales from the Timber every Tuesday at Prairie State Outdoors.com.

Your CommentsComments :: Terms :: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

What a great story…thanks for sharing it and the photo.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/17 at 10:06 AM

Sorry to say, I have a problem with this.  Why would you shoot the animal and just leave it there to rot?  Is that not unethical?  It seems to me the pelt could have been used or something.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/17 at 05:59 PM

Have to agree with Bubby.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/17 at 06:55 PM

The coyotes have been carring off farmer’s dogs in the area.  You can’t eat them.  If you want them I would be glad to give them to you, but they stink and carry vermin so you come get them if you want.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/18 at 10:18 AM

I don’t want them.  I also didn’t say they couldn’t be a problem.  I and many other I am sure, have a problem with killing an animal and letting it rot.  I am sure there are other hunters/trappers who may want it for it’s coat.  We have coyotes here too.  We just try to adapt to them as they have to adapted to us.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/18 at 05:00 PM

I say kill all the coyotes that you can and whatever you do with them is fine, they really stink. Their fur is worthless. They have no natural predators and their population is out of control. There is a shortage of upland game and they are hard on fawns also.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/18 at 06:22 PM

When I read comments like the one from skullcreek, it is no wonder hunters get a bad rep and their numbers are decreasing.  Kill ‘em all right?  Who cares, they’re worthless.  Many people hunt them for their pelts. I would have figured a hunter, such as yourself would know that.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/18 at 08:44 PM

Bring back the wolf! That would take care of them.

And by the way, if a coyote can carry off your dog, well, your dog is too small.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/19 at 02:23 PM

Wolves?  No, they would just be more game to be shot dead and left to rot.  I agree about the dogs.  Mine are quite large and I don’t have a problem with the coyotes.  I guess becasue the coyotes carry of someones dog, hawks and eagles should be shot for doing the same.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 02/19 at 07:52 PM

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