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Print

Pennsylvania farmers’ help sought to spot declining raptors

June 27, 2012 at 06:56 PM

The Associated Press

NEW ALBANY, Pa. (AP) — Farmers and rural landowners around eastern Pennsylvania’s Hawk Mountain Sanctuary are being asked to help spot four raptor species that biologists fear are on the decline in the commonwealth.

The (Easton) Express-Times (http://bit.ly/LWJBrq ) says the sanctuary has launched the Farmland Raptor Project to get a better sense of how many northern harriers, American kestrels, short-eared owls and barn owls are settling in the Keystone State to start families.

Spokeswoman Mary Linkevich says more and more animals are on private land, so those landowners are increasingly important to conservation efforts.

Linkevich says raptors prey on typical farm pests, so having them “is the sign of a healthy farm.”

She says a biologist or birder may come by to confirm a sighting and if possible band the bird for tracking purposes.

___

Information from: The Express-Times, http://www.lehighvalleylive.com


Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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