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Print

Emerald ash borer found in Whiteside County

July 22, 2013 at 02:19 PM

Illinois Department of Agriculture and The Associated Press


SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - A beetle collected on the Whiteside County Fairgrounds in Morrison has been identified as an emerald ash borer.

A forestry technician with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources spotted a distressed ash tree and notified Illinois Department of Agriculture staff, who found a dead, adult beetle in its bark.

The beetle was submitted to the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, which confirmed it as EAB.

"We have monitoring traps throughout Whiteside and its neighboring counties," EAB Program Manager Scott Schirmer said.

"Thus far, the infestation appears highly localized. In fact, we have not even been able to confirm EAB in any other ash trees on the property."

The emerald ash borer is a small, metallic-green beetle native to Asia.

Its larvae burrow into the bark of ash trees, causing the trees to starve and eventually die.

Since the first detection of the pest near Detroit, Mich., in 2002, it has killed more than 25 million ash trees.

The beetle often is difficult to detect.

Signs of infestation include thinning and yellowing leaves, D-shaped holes in the bark of the trunk or branches and basal shoots.

Anyone who suspects an ash tree has been infested should contact their county Extension office, their village forester or the Illinois Department of Agriculture.

Forty-one Illinois counties currently are under quarantine to prevent the artificial or "human-assisted" spread of the beetle through the movement of infested wood and nursery stock.

The quarantine prohibits the removal of the following items:

The emerald ash borer in any living stage of development.

Ash trees of any size.

Ash limbs and branches.

Any cut, non-coniferous firewood.

Bark from ash trees and wood chips larger than one inch from ash trees.

Ash logs and lumber with either the bark or the outer one-inch of sapwood, or both, attached.

Any item made from or containing the wood of the ash tree that is capable of spreading the emerald ash borer.

Any other article, product or means of conveyance determined by the Illinois Department of Agriculture to present a risk of spreading the beetle infestation.

Counties under quarantine are Boone, Bureau, Champaign, Clark, Coles, Cook, Cumberland, DeKalb, DeWitt, Douglas, DuPage, Edgar, Effingham, Fayette, Ford, Grundy, Henry, Iroquois, Kane, Kankakee, Kendall, Knox, Lake, LaSalle, Lee, Livingston, Macon, Marion, Marshall, McHenry, McLean, Moultrie, Ogle, Piatt, Putnam, Shelby, Stark, Vermilion, Will, Winnebago and Woodford.

For more information, visit http://www.IllinoisEAB.com.

Ash tree pest shows up at 2nd Iowa location

BURLINGTON, Iowa (AP) — A beetle that's killed millions of ash trees around the country has been found in the city of Burlington, hundreds of miles from the first sighting of the invasive insect in Iowa three years ago, officials announced Tuesday.

The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship said officials and the U.S. Department of Agriculture will issue a quarantine for Des Moines County in the next few weeks. It means a permit will be required to move hardwood firewood, ash logs and wood chips out of the area.

State Entomologist Robin Prusiner said officials are still determining whether the quarantine will be regional to include surrounding counties. She noted that could be contingent on the wood products industry in that part of the state, and whether it can continue to operate in the area.

"We hope in future weeks we will have that quarantine worked out, we will have worked with industry to fully inform everyone and hopefully draw up a good quarantine plan," she said.

The closest emerald ash borer infestation to Burlington is about 30 miles west in the Illinois city of Galesburg. The infestation was discovered last fall. But the first sighting of the metallic green beetle was made in 2010 in northeast Iowa, on Henderson Island in the Mississippi River in Allamakee County.

The beetles are native to Asia and were first detected in Michigan in 2002. Since then the insects have killed more than 50 million ash trees as the infestation moves from state to state. The beetle kills the tree in 2-4 years.

Iowa has an estimated 52 million rural ash trees and about 3 million ash trees in urban areas, according to the USDA Forest Service.




Emerald ash borer found in Perry County, Mo.

PERRYVILLE, Mo. (AP) — A quarantine of wood products from Perry County is likely, after the discovery of an insect that kills ash trees.

Perry County economic development director Scott Sattler says Missouri Department of Agriculture field agents recently found the emerald ash borer in a park in Perryville.

The larvae of the half-inch-long, emerald green beetle kill the trees by feeding on the bark of the trees.

Sattler told the Southeast Missourian (http://bit.ly/13F9bE7 ) that Perry County is not yet under quarantine. That's because the survey of the beetle's extent is ongoing. County officials expect a quarantine to be imposed in the next 30 days.

Sattler says the quarantine would affect all types of firewood.

___

Information from: Southeast Missourian, http://www.semissourian.com




Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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