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Coolest July in Illinois since 1924

August 03, 2009 at 11:22 AM

CHAMPAIGN (AP) — Last month was Illinois’ coldest July since 1924.

Preliminary data gathered by researchers at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign shows the average temperature last month was 70.4 degrees. That’s 5.3 degrees below normal.

Climatologist Jim Angel says the previous record, set 85 years ago, was 71.5 degrees.

Angel says most parts of the state haven’t had any days with temperatures in the 90s. Usually there are at least five days that hot.

Researchers say the cool down resulted in lower energy demand and poor growing conditions for some farmers.

Meanwhile, statewide precipitation was 1.1 inches above normal in July, at 4.9 inches.

Your CommentsComments :: Terms :: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

One word sums it up, El Nino’. Next to come is a mild winter.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 08/03 at 11:39 AM

It’s got to be global war, I mean cooling!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 08/03 at 01:43 PM

jeff202, I’ve grown tomatoes for years and have had that same problem when there was too much nitrogen in the fertilizer. Strong vines/leaves with little to no fruit. Could that be the problem? Not an expert but just passing on what I’ve been told!

Posted by Marc Anthony on 08/03 at 01:53 PM

i’m sure its global warming. the liberals will claim it is a typical cycle in the global warming process. the real fact is we have not increased in global temperature since 1995.  The good ole state run media hasn’t reported it.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 08/03 at 08:43 PM

Jeff2020, Some causes for too much nitrogen are: Garden too close to lawn grass, not rotating crops (beans for example, will put nitrogen into the soil while crops like corn will consume nitrogen. This is why farmers rotate their crops yearly), fertilizer that is not made for tomatoes (lawn fertilizer), cut grass clippings that filter over into the garden, etc. I’ve had my fair share of headaches with tomatoes including blossom end rot, viruses, etc. I’ve tried the spade pruning, adding more calcium, sulfur, etc. with some success with fruit production but no help with the viruses. I hope you can find something that works before it’s too late!

Posted by Marc Anthony on 08/04 at 07:59 AM

It was cooler because of all the standing corn and the deer hideing in the cornfields. Deer moveing about in the corn pushes the cooler air at the base of the stalks out creating large pockets of super cooled air for a radius of 3 kilometers aound every field. In addtion, weather observer numbers may have been held down in some counties due to possum flatulence.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 08/04 at 08:14 AM

“In addtion, weather observer numbers may have been held down in some counties due to possum flatulence”
...
I just spewed a mouthfull of coffee on my keyboard, thanks.

Posted by Henry Holt on 08/04 at 09:38 AM

Wheres Al Gore when we need him?

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 08/04 at 09:51 AM

No need to fret about global warming. It is an El Nino’ weather pattern. Kind of hard for people in the prarie to appeciate when you are surounded by miles and miles of corn and soybean fields.

It’s neat out here in California because it’s time to catch some of those yellowfin tuna, dorado and marlin that followed the warm water up from Cabo San Lucas.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 08/04 at 12:01 PM

I put three or four carp under each of my tomato plants and don’t have a problem with excess nitrogen reducing the yields.  In fact the tomatoes usually go nuts (in both fruit and vine).  This cool summer has affected the ripening tho’. I planted late due to all the rain too.  Lots of green ‘maters on the vine.  Only a few ripe ones so far.  :(

Posted by HNI-Christine on 08/05 at 01:51 AM

Maybe we should start a thread on the Forum about gardening? Who knew. Very interesting. You just never know what tangent comments will take.

Posted by Jeff Lampe on 08/05 at 07:10 AM

This can happen when people have too much time on there hands.Tomatos today Potatos tomorrow. But its nice we are not on the governments case for a change. Thats a breath of fresh air.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 08/05 at 08:55 AM

sounds like a new way to get rid of the asian carp…buy a topsy turvy tomatoe planter ,get a free fish head.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 08/07 at 11:12 AM

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