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Illinois hunting and fishing

Wolf shot near Walnut in Illinois?

March 15, 2010 at 08:56 AM

A large canine that appears to be a wolf has been shot near Walnut in Bureau County according to Dale Bowman of the Chicago Sun-Times.

Bowman reports that a reader sent him the above photos of an apparent wolf that weighed 140 pounds near Walnut last week.

As we reported Sunday, Clara and Joe Steele of Kewanee reported seeing what they thought was a wolf on Feb. 25 near the Bureau County line.

The Steeles were driving home to Kewanee from Henry along the Bradford blacktop on Feb. 25 and were east of the Tiskilwa blacktop when a group of running deer caught their eye. Then something even more impressive emerged.

“We waited and then across the road came the largest wolf you’ve ever seen,” Steele said. “It was no coyote. It was a big wolf, mostly dark with a bushy tail. It was awesome.”

The Steeles stopped and got a good look at the big canine, which stopped briefly after running into a nearby patch of trees. “My husband is no novice and he said that was a wolf,” Clara Steele said.

Illinois has had at least four confirmed wolves since 2001, including one shot by Randy Worker in 2002 that was within a few miles of where the Steele’s saw their big canine. Another wolf almost certainly had to have passed through Illinois during that same time period.

This is the time of year when young male wolves leave the pack and wander off on their own. Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan all have wolf populations.

Here is the recent history of wild wolves that likely spent time in Illinois.

  • 2001—There’s a good chance another timber wolf wandered through Illinois this year. That radio-tagged animal left Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and journeyed more than 500 miles to northeastern Missouri, where it was shot by a hunter who believed he was killing a coyote.
  • 2002—The first confirmed wild wolf in Illinois was shot by Randy Worker on Dec. 29, 2002 in Marshall County near Henry (also along the Illinois River). Worker was coyote hunting when he shot the wolf, which was thought to have wandered south out of Wisconsin.
  • 2003—A wolf wearing a radio collar placed on it by Wisconsin researchers was killed in Indiana. Most believe this wolf passed through Illinois, even though nobody reported seeing it.
  • 2005—The last wild wolf in the Chicago area was killed by a car in Lake County near the Chain O’Lakes State Park on Feb. 17, 2005. That wolf, too, was thought to have wandered south out of Wisconsin.
  • 2005—The last confirmed timber wolf in Illinois was killed in December of 2005 in Pike County by Seth Hall, who was hunting coyotes near New Canton. The wolf was confirmed as wild and part of the Great Lakes pack originating in Minnesota, Wisconsin or Michigan.
  • 2008—A 145-pound canine shot near Lena on Feb. 19 by a coyote hunter was confirmed as a wolf after initial reports speculated the size of the canine might indicate it was a hybrid.  The wolf was confirmed as wild and part of the Great Lakes pack originating in Minnesota, Wisconsin or Michigan. The stomach was empty but there was rabbit hair in the colon, said Glen Kruse of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

 

 

Your CommentsComments :: Terms :: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Now I don’t feel as nuts for seeing what I saw in Knox County about a month ago.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/15 at 10:56 AM

It’s only a matter of time…if coyotes thrive…wolves will also!

Posted by HawgNSonsTV on 03/15 at 12:20 PM

I don’t believe that wolves will “thrive” in Illinois. I feel that any wolf that spends an extended period of time in Illinois will more than likely endure the same fate as the recent transients have. We will probably continue to see the occasional transient.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/15 at 02:04 PM

Interesting timing as a neighbor (Ogle County) got a photo of a wolf this past week (confirmed by IDNR field biologist and Springfield). I am having my web integrator post up photos and a story later today hopefully. Check later at http://www.Heartlandillinois.com

Posted by Bob Coine on 03/15 at 02:55 PM

I seen a wolf in JoDavies county back in 08.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/15 at 03:01 PM

From what I heard and I live about 15 miles from where it was shot is the DNR will not confirm or deny what the animal is.  Though most have a good idea from the picture.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/15 at 04:56 PM

ya wolves probably wont thrive because every time you here about a wolf its dead the next day . no regulations at all

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/15 at 08:18 PM

jsmiff,
  Although I would never advocate for the extermination of a species, the reason I feel they will never “thrive” in Illinois is due to the human population. With a state as populous as Illinois, I don’t think there is enough room for both. I suspect that we will continue to see the occasional straggler come in from Wisconsin.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/15 at 09:09 PM

Why was the wolf shot? Is it legal to shoot a wolf? What was the wolf doing to get itself shot and not trapped or stunned to be replaced in another area?

It’s not very often that a wolf will attack a human. I am NOT a PETA person. I hunt, fish…

Natty

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/15 at 09:24 PM

leave the wolves alone they are far better hunters than we will ever be

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/15 at 09:47 PM

Bonecollector,
  I am skeptical, about the wolves anyway.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/15 at 10:34 PM

Didn’t someone JUST get killed in Alaska by a wolf..not so rare is it..no different than a yote.shoot em up boys.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 01:35 AM

Sort of ironic that this thread coincides with an article in the recent issue of National Geographic covering the wolf debate out west:

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2010/03/wolf-wars/chadwick-text

Amazing how proliferative the species is. Going from nearly zero individuals in the early 1980s to nearly 2,000 today (in the western states only, not to mention MN and Isle Royale). Of course, their numbers were facilitated by a few reintroduction efforts….

Wolves in Illinois are like cougars. They may continue to appear as transients, but they won’t last. Especially as there is a year-round open season on coyotes (similarity of appearance). I know that every coyote hunter can tell the difference between a wolf and coyote at 100 yds. smile

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 06:45 AM

No protections in Illinois? True under Illinois regs but remember federal laws still apply. Wolves are still protected under the Endangered Species Act. Certain populations of wolves are listed so if you shoot a wolf you can expect a visit from the US Fish and Wildlife Service Agents.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 07:01 AM

I’m not to far from where it was shot. I’ve heard about people seeing them for years in the area but have never seen one myself. I don’t know what it is about that area but there have been straggler wolf, bear elk and cougar found around there. I guess we shouldn’t be shocked by it. Animals move around.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 07:26 AM

Unfortunately it seems some of our brethren here all ill-informed in regards to the wolf population here in the U.S., particularly the northern states of WI, MN, and MI. Please do not buy into the propoganda that is being pumped out by the animal rights org’s like HSUS and PETA. You are only hurting yourself as a hunter. Just get on some hunting forums (i.e. archerytalk.com) and get informed about the devestation the newly introduced wolf pop’s are having on game populations (primarily deer). There are no man’t techniques in place to keep these wolf pop’s in check. Ask any hunter up there. If they see a wolf in their neck of the woods then the deer are GONE (either killed off or migrated). Wolves are one of only a few predators in the world that will kill for sport. Thats right, several northern state hunters are observing wolves stalking, hunting and killing for the sport only to leave the carcass left to rot. I’m hearing more and more about family pets and hunting/coon dogs being found mauled/eaten by wolf packs. Folks, we’d better wise up to the situation. If a sustainable pack makes it into the miss. river valley and down into southern IL they will proliferate. The DNR and Fed agencies will slap reg’s on them limiting us hunters to self defense as the only means of taking this query. That is exactly what is happening to our neighbors up north…....

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 07:49 AM

Also, someone mentioned establishing breeding packs in the southern states to get the feral pig problem under control. I’m not picking on this person in particular because throughout our history this sort of ideology has been deployed with devestating consequences. For example, the australian gov’t brought feral or non indingenous cats (common house cat to us) to their country to combat a proliferation of an invasive, foreign mouse specy that was breeding out of control, causing the spread of disease to both human and lifestock alike. Well, the cats did the trick however onces the mouse problem was taken care of it seamed the cats had few or no natural predators. The cats (which are apex predators in their own rights) began taking a huge, huge toll on their song bird populations. The aussie’s are still trying to get this problem under control. This type of thing always happens when a non indigenous specy is introduced to into a foreign environment. The wolves would have the the pigs in check within 5 years, however with such a great food source breeding conditions would be superb for the wolf population and with the regs against hunting them, they would absolutely grow out of control. With no natural predators (us being denied hunting them) what keeps them in check? Next thing you know you start seeing life stock getting snatched up. Wolves start showing up in peoples back yards where kids are playing… You get what I’m saying…............. We must be careful what we ask for. I definitely do not want a sustainable wolf population in IL. The DNR does a fine job of decimating our deer herd by allowing unlimited tags to non-res hunters (yeah, I know they set a limit (like 30,000) but we’ve never sold out!). Don’t listen to the numbers they pump out every year. They dont do near the foot work they should to get accurate estimates of the herd (simply because they are undermanned), and it would be detrimental to the reputation of the state (of being THE destination for trophy whitetail)if the true numbers were reported. They know that would have an adverse impact on an already poor state economy.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 08:05 AM

iliscorrupt….... its call the three S’s…... Shoot, Shovel and Shutup wink

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 08:06 AM

Just how many people have been eaten lately by wolves? I think it would be cool to have em in IL.So what if a pack ate a few deer and ole blue the coon dog. Look at it this way at least the pack wouldn’t have to buy tags and stamps and hoped they had a place to hunt. Really if we had em I’ll bet they would chase deer out of the standing corn and it would better for us. Think about it theres always a ray of sunshine. Howloooo

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 08:17 AM

i think it be neat to have a few around here i am a hunter fisherman.  but i would have to say they would be fun to hunt

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 08:27 AM

bowboy, wolves are protected. You wouldnt be able to hunt them. All you would be able to do is sit by idly watching them grow in numbers as the deer herd numbers dwindle. Dont believe me? Ask any hunter in MN

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 08:30 AM

For the gent’s that justify having wolves here by saying it would be “neat” or “cool”....... please explore this link. it is a link of the wolf threads in one of the most visited bowhunting sites on the web….......... http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/search.php?searchid=21112899

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 08:38 AM

I have put up the photo of a live Illinois wolf taken last week on my website…

http://www.heartlandillinois.com

Posted by Bob Coine on 03/16 at 12:10 PM

JRH,
  Not advocating for their introduction here But…..........How can you classify them as a “non indigenous species introduced to a foreign environment”?

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 12:30 PM

Rasputin, i’m speculating but I dont think wolves were ever indigenous to the southern states that have the worst feral pig problems i.e. louisiana, arkansas, alabama…... I’m also fairly certain that wolves were never natural inhabitants of the greater portion of the state of IL.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 12:43 PM

regardless rasputin, when speaking in terms of whats indigenous and whats not, we still have to take into account that a species that was indigenous a century ago (just as an example) was huntable and kept in check by hunters at that time in history. We would be unable to do that now.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 12:45 PM

JRH,
  I agree and disagree. The historic range of the eastern or Red Wolf is thought to have extended into the southeast as far as Texas. However, at the time that the Red Wolf inhabited its former range, it is highly doubtful that a population of feral pigs was present.
  Now that the population of feral pigs has been exposed to genetics of the Russian Boar, the behavior of feral pigs has been modified. To think that the introduction of the Gray Wolf in the southeast would have an impact of the present feral pig population would be considered guess work at best. It would be interesting to find out if wolves made/make an impact on Russian Boar in their native lands. I honestly don’t know the answer to that question.
“IF” a resident population of wolves were to become established in our area or in the southeast and IF they were granted federal protection their populations would likely soar.

PS at the time of the European migration to Illinois, there was a thriving population of wolves, at least in the southern part of the state.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 01:02 PM

I saw on the DNRs web site a year ago that they were going to reintroduce wolves bobcats and cougars in Illinois. They now deny that and the information has been removed from their web site. Ive seen DNR vehicles along the road ways around London Mills on two separate occasions with tracking antennas sticking out their windows. Their not tracking wild turkeys.Myself and others have seen cougars in this area and at least one wolf unconfirmed sighting.

I stand by my assertions that they have been released in Illinois until some one can prove me wrong.

Wildsurvivor

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 01:13 PM

Wildsurvivor,
  I don’t believe the bobcat was ever extirpated in the state of Illinois. I have had discussions about their “relocation” within the state of Illinois and that has been confirmed.
I had an opportunity to duck hunt with Brent Manning in southern Illinois several years ago. We had a lengthy conversation about mountain lions at that time. He vehemently denied that they were being “reintroduced”. He did however admit that they were “here” and indicated that they were “studying the issue”

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 01:21 PM

Rasputin is right. Red wolves historically ranged throughout the east/southeast. They are currently restricted to and under intense management in a few isolated places in the southeast (mostly NC).
http://ecos.fws.gov/speciesProfile/profile/speciesProfile.action?spcode=A00F
Wolves were historically native to IL too. Not sure how anyone with internet access can refute that. Should they be reintroduced? Not for me to say, but it sounds like they are doing just fine elsewhere and we should be spending money on a few more higher-priority items. Now if they migrate into the state on their own, under our current regulations no “coyote hunter” will ever be reprimanded for shooting a wolf.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 01:35 PM

never heard that wolves r protected if they r then y do places offer hunts for them i have seen on tv and m,agizines where they r hunted so if they r protected then by what law

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 01:35 PM

Certain populations are protected. Those in ID and MT are not (they were recently de-listed from the ESA). Those in MI, MN, WI and elsewhere in the midwest are still protected (ESA-Endandered or Threatened).

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 01:50 PM

Wolves that once inhabitated Illinois were what they called Prairie wolves. They were good sized creatures with plenty to eat on the prairies of our state.Wolves do not kill for the “sport” of it despite what is said here. In fact the wolf pack will first size up its prey and will typically take an old feeble animal or one that is sick, crippled etc. Wolves will not generally attack, let’s say a healthy bull elk.
It is funny when we hear others talk about wolves, their hunting tactics, distribution etc. when they don’t really seem to know what they are talking about but yet seem to cut loose with false information. 
Roaming males are indeed possible in our state and I do not doubt these claims. But c’mon, worried about them attacking our children. Just another “little Red Riding Hood” myth.
I would worry more about the coyotes in this state as they are the ones becoming bolder day by day. Not long ago a famous singer in Canada was attacked and killed by several coyotes who in turn were eating her when police arrived and shot at least one of the coyotes.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 02:18 PM

I have to throw one more thing in here. As far as wolves out west and the decline of some elk numbers then I must refer to a recent study in Yellowstone where a number of things have resulted in elk decline there and it has nothing to do with wolves. Severe drought and a few severe winters have killed many elk there. And while many first suggessted that the wolf was the main culprit in declining elk numbers, (the elk decline began about the same time as wolf relocation in Yellowstone), they were indeed wrong. A study now suggests that bears, mainy grizzlies, are killing six times as many elk calves as wolves. And with grizzly numbers soaring in Yellowstone, elk numbers have been declining. Therefore hunters that hunt outside of the Yellowstone Park area are seeing fewer elk leave the park.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 02:33 PM

Kwright, I don’t know if you saw one of my posts about a month ago on another similar thread, but I had a wolf encounter in Knox County while shed hunting.  While some on here are sure to say I’m nuts and I saw the neighbor’s dog or a big coyote, I know what I saw and I saw it up close.  Very close.  It was in a culvert next to a half-eaten deer when I saw it.  As soon as it saw me, it immediately ran up the bank at me.  I got one shot off right in front of it and it turned and crossed the road into a cut corn field.  I was within 10 feet of this thing.  Though some may not believe me, I know what I saw.  Now it may have been one of these 75% wolf, 25% domestic dogs that some knuckleheads breed, but this thing was all wolf from what I saw and it was hell-bent on coming after me.  I’m sure the half-eaten deer had something to do with him coming at me the way he did.  So when it comes to wolves not attacking humans, I’m not buying it.  I once witnesses one single coyote take down a perfectly healthy big doe.  He continued to bite at her rear tendons till she couldn’t walk anymore.  Once he had her in that position, he grabbed onto her throat and that was it.  The whole thing took about a half hour in my old timber.  I watched the whole thing go down.  If a single coyote can take down a big healthy doe, why wouldn’t a pack of wolves be able to take down a healthy bull elk?  They’re hunters and opportunists.  They are not nearly as selective as some give them credit for being.  I used to raise pheasants and quail in a large fly pen….about 300 birds in all.  In one night, one coyote, one, killed all birds but seven pheasants.  He didn’t eat them all, he killed them for sport and out of instinct.  Having wolves in Illinois is completely unecessary and unwarranted.  One kid’s life is not worth the “coolness” of having lions and wolves in Illinois.  I can’t think of one thing that a pack of wolves can do that we can’t do better with proper legislation and the right people in charge.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 03:24 PM

I just hope this makes the mainstream news. Mushroom season is not far away and wolves in the woods, along with cougar, panther and bear sightings cuts down the competition.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 06:02 PM
Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 09:15 PM

Kwright is right on with his comments. 


Comments from other posts that I enjoyed.

Best laugh out loud comment goes to…...
“Wolves would absolutely grow out of control. With no natural predators (us being denied hunting them
A uncontrollable Wolf population in Illinois.”

Best afraid of the unknown…......
“Didn?t someone JUST get killed in Alaska by a wolf..not so rare is it.”

Ya its rare.  Today a guy jogging on the beach while listening to his IPOD was killed by a plane that had to make an emergency landing.  I’m not throwing my IPOD and gym shoes into the garbage.  I worry about real threats in life, like clean drinking water, good health care, the guy on the phone driving a white van that almost rear ended me going 80MPH.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 09:56 PM

Kwright and Quetico are absolutely wrong.  Wolves do not only kill the sick and the weak, there is no question they sport hunt and they do not kill humanely. 

Kwrights comments about wolves not killing mature bull elk proves his ignorance.  Wolves most certainly target mature bull elk, especially after the rut when they are tired, weak and more solitary. 

Kwright tells us to not be threatened by wolves and then suggest we should instead be concerned about coyotes.  Yeah - because coyotes kill humans all the time.  Ridiculous.

And to suggest the reduction of the elk herds in and around Yellowstone is not primarily because of the reintroduction of wolves is (I suspect) an outright lie. If it is not an outright lie, it is further proof Kwright has no idea what he is talking about. 

If wolves were truly endangered in North America I would be all for reintroducing them anywhere the habit would support a population.  The fact is they are not endangered, there are plenty of wolves in Alaska, Canada, the upper midwest and now the mountain states. 

Treehugger is spot on…nothing good will come of having wolves in IL, absolutely nothing.  They will kill livestock, they will kill any dog they are able to and they will greatly reduce the deer population wherever they exist.  If you want to feel warm and fuzzy about having wolves around…feel warm and fuzzy about the 10’s of thousand that already exist. 

Really get informed about wolves before you make up your mind.  Don’t buy the “they only kill the sick and weak” arguments.  Those arguments are old, tired and not true.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 10:46 PM

I highly doubt the farm bureau will come out in favor of wolves. 


Just one example of why not….

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2009/aug/28/wolves-kill-120-sheep-near-dillon-mont/

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 11:31 PM

AJ,

I’m not against regulated hunting of wolves.  A few states already have it. Kwright didn’t touch on that subject.

I laugh at the idea that the wolf population can become uncontrollable in Illinois.  We wiped them out in the 1800’s.  I think the human population in Illinois has grown in the last hundred years and there won’t ever be a wolf population in Illinois large enough to cause change in the food chain.

I’m also don’t consider Wolves in Illinois a threat.  The meth houses in those small towns, thats a threat.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 11:32 PM

I agree Quetico - wolves won’t become established in IL.  But - if allowed, it could happen in a few areas.


In terms of an uncontrollable population, in the current political climate that could also happen.  I don’t think it will, but it could.  If a couple of packs beat the odds and became established in IL…no way you could legally (or illegally) wipe them out (again).  If the state and feds decided it should happen, practically speaking you could use planes and helicopters and get the job done.


Yes - I also agree meth labs are a huge problem, but it has nothing to do with wolves.

Have a good night…

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/16 at 11:46 PM

Ajfranks said it when he said that wolves will attack a bull elk if it is “weak or tired” so your statement then contardicts itself. Isnt that what I suggested in my post that these are the animals that wolves will target. A healthy, strong bull elk will not be a target for wolves. They will indeed seek out the weakest animals first.
How many true wolf attacks on humans have you heard about? Very darn few and go back in time and you will come back with very few if any. I am not saying lets bring back wolves in Illinois, lets just don’t cry wolf just yet.
I was once fly fishing a remote valley near Yellowstone Park and came upon a wolf feeding on an elk carcus, that wolf had every opportunity to take me out but it high-tailed it out of that valley.
and AJ my statement about elk populations was based on a study done, I have no reason to lie about it, check them out for yourself and don’t be afraid of the big bad wolf.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/17 at 12:23 AM

good job keep shooting them…

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/17 at 04:32 AM

It’s funny how peoples perception of things differ!  I posted the link to this story on my FaceBook page on Monday. Almost immediately PRAIRIE STATE OUTDOORS very own Andrew’s Adventures

Andrew ‘Endy’ Ragas posted his view ” farmers will shoot anything on site. somebody should have relocated it to another state where they are actually respected by people. shame”

My Response “Trent Schneider lol…respected by who? tree huggers? They are decimating the deer, elk, moose etc everywhere they have been reintroduced. It’s a damn wolf…NO better than a coyote that you can hunt year round”

Andrew ‘Endy’ Ragas “you know how many deer there are here in the upper midwest?

give me a break!”

Trent Schneider “Andrew…maybe you should talk to a few people from Wisconsin…see how they LOVE the wolf!”

Andrew ‘Endy’ Ragas “i live in northern wisconsin for almost half the year. I DO KNOW, AND WE WORSHIP THEM LIKE THE LOONS!
=)”

Trent Schneider “who worships them? tree huggers? I am sure…I am talking hunters & farmers…NOT tree huggers peta freaks!”

Andrew ‘Endy’ Ragas “TRENT - well, i am not a hunter like yourself. there is a difference between a man with a gun and an animal who lives in the wild.

big difference. you control the animal populations with your shotgun, right? so it’s almost the same with a wolf except they don’t need ammunition.

if you are accusing me of being a tree hugger or a peta freak, you are majorly mistaken. if true - sorry. i’ll try and argue with someone who isn’t as close-minded the next time.

I don’t need a gun either to win a fight.

later.”

Trent Schneider “Andrew… lol…you’re funny YOUNG man! Find a GUN in ANY picture with me! I don’t Need a gun I use a bow. ONLY because they have NOT opened a season for KNIFE hunters yet. I could probably take a deer with my bare hands…BUT that is inhumane and NOT quick and painless…

I never accused you of anything…but NOW I will..you know little of what your talking about ...when it comes to ME, for sure. And when it comes to wolves it appears that way also.

I bet you have never even been in a fight…pillow talk does NOT count!”

Trent Schneider “And DO NOT ever accuse me of being close minded! Once again you know little of what you are talking about. If open minded is the philosophy that anything is possible…A dangerous philosophy because we know that is NOT true!
I strive for an ACTIVE mind! Than Close minded is and equally dangerous philosophy that NOTHING is possible!

Never the less… I want YOU to refer to me as… The Deer Whisperer!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1girVb4cGww

Posted by HawgNSonsTV on 03/17 at 07:45 AM

I went on to look for answers with another post:

Trent Schneider “HOW MANY of you PEOPLE from WISCONSIN….WORSHIP the WOLF? PLEASE TELL ME NOW?”

Andrew ‘Endy’ Ragas “you are a tool.”


AND then REMOVED ME FROM HIS FRIENDS LIST!!!

Posted by HawgNSonsTV on 03/17 at 07:48 AM

Oh my, to be insulted on facebook, the ultimate travesty here is being removed from someones friends list rather than the little wolfy.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/17 at 08:03 AM

@illinoisbonecollector ... Thanks Bro! Thanks alot!

Posted by HawgNSonsTV on 03/17 at 08:39 AM

Kwright - reread my post.  I said especially, not only.  Wolves will kill bull elk anytime of the year. Why? Because they can and for no other reason.  A bull tired from the rut is not a sick animal, it is a worn out one.  Killing a healthy but tired bull elk does nothing to improve the overall health of the herd.


There have been two documented cases of wolves killing humans in north america.  I suspect there were a few more in the old days before documentation of events.

The reason I brought it up is because you used the ‘very few deaths from wolves’ argument to assure people we should not fear them.  And then you turned around and used the only death by coyote case to tell us we should instead fear coyotes.  Your argument suggest - if coyotes kill one human we should fear them, so we should logically fear wolves twice as much.   


One last thing…please dig up your study that proves wolves have not been the primary reason elk numbers are down in Yellowstone.  Please post a link, I would really like to read the article.  Thanks…

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/17 at 08:56 AM

It is illegal to kill a wolf in Illinois. Whoever shot the wolf committed a crime. Altho, of course, there is zero chance he/she will be prosecuted.

If this critter was not a wolf, did the shooter just want to kill a large dog? I own a German Shepherd female from Germany. Shepherds from Germany can look like wolves. Mine sure does.

Coyote can be killed of course, but not the wolf. I understand deer hunters might think a single wolf could eat all the deer in Illinois. Suck it up guys, there are plenty of deer to share a few to a single wolf.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 03/17 at 08:56 AM

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