Illinois Outdoors at PrairiestateOutdoors.com
RulesIllinois Outdoors at PrairiestateOutdoors.com

Prairie State Outdoors Categories

Top Story :: Opinion :: Illinois Outdoor News :: Fishing News :: Hunting News :: Birding News :: Nature Stories :: Miscellaneous News :: Fishing :: Big Fish Fridays :: Big Fish Stories :: State Fishing Reports :: Other Fishing Reports :: Fishing Tips, Tactics & Tales :: Where to Fish :: Fishing Calendar :: Hunting :: Hunting Reports :: Hunting Tips, Tactics & Tales :: Where to Hunt :: Tales from the Timber :: Turkey Tales :: Hunting Calendar :: Big Game Stories :: Nature and Birding :: Birding Bits :: Nature Newsbits :: Critter Corner :: Birding Calendar :: Stargazing :: In the Wild :: Miscellaneous Reports and Shorts :: Links :: Hunting Links :: Birding Links :: Video ::

Big Buck Stories

1960s :: 1980s :: 1991-92 :: 1992-93 :: 1993-94 :: 1994-95 :: 1995-96 :: 1997-98 :: 1998-99 :: 1999-2000 :: 2000-01 :: 2001-02 :: 2003-04 :: 2004-05 :: 2005-06 :: 2006-07 :: 2007-08 :: 2008-09 :: 2009-10 :: 2010-11 :: 2011-12 :: 2012-13 ::

Scattershooting

Flathead's Picture of the Week :: Big bucks :: Birdwatching :: Cougars :: Dogs :: Critters :: Fishing :: Asian carp :: Bass :: Catfish :: Crappie :: Ice :: Muskie :: Humor :: Hunting :: Deer :: Ducks :: Geese :: Turkey :: Upland game :: Misc. :: Mushrooms :: Open Blog Thursday :: Picture A Day 2010 :: Plants and trees :: Politics :: Prairie :: Scattershooting :: Tales from the Trail Cams :: Wild Things ::


Print

Cougar killed 90 miles west of Illinois

December 15, 2009 at 03:07 PM

UPDATE: Cougar is a male, not a female as first reported.

DES MOINES - A mountain lion was shot near Marengo, Monday afternoon, by a deer hunter participating in Iowa’s second shotgun season. 

Raymond Goebel, Jr., of Cedar Rapids, was hunting with a group, 4 miles southwest of Marengo, which is located west of Iowa City, about 90 miles west of the Illinois border. The group had decided to sit around 3:30 p.m., and watch for deer on the move. Goebel looked over his left shoulder and something caught his eye about 15 yards up in a tree.  He looked through the scope on his gun and couldn’t believe what he was seeing.

“It is what I thought it is,” Goebel said.

About 30 minutes passed when another hunter in the group a short distance away stood up. Goebel waved him over and pointed to the figure in the tree.  After discussions about the legality of shooting it and gaining approval from the landowner, Goebel shot the cat.

Brad Baker, state conservation officer with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, said the mountain lion weighed about 125 pounds, and although originally thought to be a female, biologists later confirmed that it was a male.  Baker said the condition of the teeth and claws and the lack of markings from ear tags lead him to the conclusion.

Ron Andrews, state furbearer biologist with the Iowa DNR, said all other lions confirmed in Iowa were young males as was this one.

This is the first confirmed sighting in Iowa in more than five years, and the fourth mountain lion killed in Iowa.  Mountain lions have no protection in Iowa and while the Iowa DNR does not encourage people killing a lion they come across, it is not against the law. 

There had been reports of a mountain lion in the Tama area that Andrews investigated and he said the evidence did not point to a mountain lion, but it was difficult to find because the investigation occurred in the summer.  Andrews receives two to three reports of mountain lion sightings per month from across Iowa, but finding confirming evidence is difficult.

These animals in the Midwest travel great distances in a short time looking for other cougars, he said.  “They are not here in great numbers,” Andrews said.  “But this shooting will likely prompt many additional unconfirmed sightings. Our experience investigating these reports has found that more than 90 percent are mistaken identity for bobcats, yellow-colored dogs or deer, which are the same color as mountain lions.”

Goebel said he plans to have a full body mount of the mountain lion.  The DNR will receive the stomach contents, and tissue and blood samples for DNA analysis.

Your CommentsComments :: Terms :: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Phew. Some relief from the deer debate.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/15 at 03:36 PM

Can one of the sites more thoughtful hunters explain to me why this cougar was killed for a trophy?  Would it have been killed by the IDNR anyway?  It seems like a strange behavior to spot such a unique animal sitting in a tree and then shooting it for no apparent reason.  It didn’t sound like it was done in self defense.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/15 at 04:33 PM

It’s just a matter of time…..If we don’t have a breeding population already.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/15 at 05:35 PM

Yeah im waiting for bigfoot to come through to ,when do they rut? Wonder how much for full mount?

Posted by trolloni on 12/15 at 07:57 PM

I’m stunned that it wasn’t hiding in the standing corn! (sorry, couldn’t help myself!)

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/15 at 09:21 PM

I thought the only mountain lions near illinois were young males who got pushed out of their home range? At least that is what they have said about every other one. Guess they will have to change their tune a bit.

Posted by illin on 12/16 at 06:53 AM

Spicoli, I’m not sure you got the answer you were looking for. Since I only shoot game that I can eat, taking a rare critter like this is a waste…unless you eat it.  Some feel compelled to take them since they are not protected by any game laws.  Some fear these animals and don’t want them in the same woods.  I’ve seen one in Illinois bow hunting but wouldn’t think of shooting it.  Does it make me sort of “uneasy” knowing these things roam the earth. Nope. Mt. Lions have to eat too.smile  I’m sure this will start the debate of killing for “sport” vs food or just blame DNR and be done with it.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 08:04 AM

Yeah. Me too I would have never killed it. But than again mushroom huntin would be more a tad more interesting. With so many more guys hunting now we are lucky we got the critters we do have. Maybe standing corn is agood thing after all.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 08:25 AM

Well, you just about have to shoot one to prove that you REALLY did see one (and prove it is a WILD one), as it seems like every time a sighting is reported, the sighting is dismissed as a “captive” that got loose, a house cat, a bobcat or a UFO . . . by the DNR and local authorities.  I have no desire to shoot one while at the same time, I have no desire to encounter one in the outdoors either.  So, I say keep them out of Illinois.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 08:36 AM

During the second shotgun deer season a young man showed me pictures on his cell phone of large cat footprints he found at his deer hunting site.  This was at the western part of the state near the Iowa border. 
Lions are in Illinois, at this point I’d rather observe them, maybe get a photo, but not shoot them…YET.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 08:39 AM

people have been shooting coyotes,foxes and coons for ever and no one questions why they don’t get eaten, this is no different.i’d like to have a full body mount in my basement, congrats

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 08:49 AM

I live minutes from where this cat was shot and am appalled. These gorgeous animals lived here long before we did. We are the reason they don’t live here anymore. Elephants aren’t protected here either so can I shoot one of those. People want to shoot things just because it’s not protected. I spend countless hundreds of hours in the forests of NE Iowa every year and never leave home without my camera. Why not just take a picture? There was a black bear wandering through this area last year and brought with it much joy and excitement as people spotted it and saw on the local news channels what it was up to. It hung around because it felt safe, would this cat have done the same?

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 08:50 AM

“Wild” is a relative term.  To a city dweller, a zoo might seem like a “wild” place.  To the average “hunter”, an Illinois woodlot might seem like a wild place.  To be defined as true wilderness, it is imperative that apex predators occupy the landscape.  So while killing apex predators (like this one cornered in a tree) might satisfy the immature and uneducated “big game trophy blood-lust” of some people, killing apex predators for motives other than self-defense is hardly a manly thing to do. 

I would enjoy seeing these animals as part of my outdoor experience.  How is it not thrill to know that you are not the only species of hunter in the woods? 

So if you are scared of the dark and not brave enough to face a “what if” out in the woods, please stay in the house.  You’re ruining my hunt and turning my woodlot into a childrens’ petting zoo.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 08:53 AM

there also has been citings just outside muscatine around the cedar river bottoms of a mountainlion on a trail camera but the dnr failed to believe saying that it was stagged

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 09:01 AM

Wow. Really cool. I think I understand now. So it is only ok to shoot something that used to be native that the government spent millions of dollars on to re-introduce them to the area. So when a species does it on its own it is a bad thing. So we just shoot everything that supposedly “doesn’t belong here” that the government hasn’t spent any money on. K…. It doesn’t take a higher level of intelligence to know that this is wrong. If they had to stop and think about whether or not it was right to shoot it they shouldn’t have done it in the first place. I don’t care what it was.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 09:28 AM

Spoon River - there are all kinds of other hunters in our woodlots today (coyote, fox, cats, bobcats, etc).  I enjoy observing these and none of those animals pose a viable threat to me.  Cougars are known and documented to kill - and usually the innocent who are not outdoors to hunt in the first place.  At least, I’d like to know I’m taking that chance when I enter the Illinois woods.  I realize (and accept) all the other dangers that come with hunting IL (falls from tree, being shot by another hunter accidentally, etc).  When you hunt grizzly’s in Alaska or cougars out west, you know you are taking that chance.  Same as if you want to sky-dive or bungee jump; these are not adventures for me (guess I’m just too dang old or not “manly” enough for you).  If you want to have animals in our local eco-system that hunt us back, then why not release a few Al Queda or Taliban fighters as well, since they seem to like to hunt us down, just to make it more challenging?

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 09:49 AM

he put as much effort in that cat hunt as anyone of the hundreds of guys forking over big bucks to the outfitters to set them up on a big buck.all they do is write a check,get led to the stand,aim and pull the trigger,they call their kill a trophy,so why can’t he?

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 10:10 AM

seriously if i seen one i would give him a chance let him see me then i would proly shoot if he was just watchin me it would be scary this guy couldve ben getting stalked an didnt know it anyone ever ben kinda stalked by a buck its a creepy feeling an this is a cat hundred pounds the thing could kill me so maybe if he above me he will die so i dont a trophy yes a acheivment an good hunting skills no pure luck an ive killed deer this way pure luck just was his day that day i guess congrats guy call a good taxidermist

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 10:35 AM

Gilly…If you don’t like the odds of running into big cat out in the woods, then you should also insulate yourself from all the other dangers in the world.  Cars kill thousands of innocent people every year…so should we eliminate cars?  You should also stay away from guns, swing sets, ill-tempered dogs, bathtubs, meatball sandwiches and hospitals….all of which cause more death than mountain lions.

Man-up, Dude!

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 10:36 AM

Cougars are predators and so am I.  Good luck cougars.  If I see one, shots will be fired.  I do not need my kids and horses threatened.  People get attacked in California all the time.  I will do what I can to make sure that doesn’t happen where I live.  I don’t care if I kill it with bow, gun or Ford.  I will not feel bad.  I will not make excuses.  We are too populated to live with cougars.  I could care less if the guy eats it or not.  Job well done.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 10:52 AM

Call it a loophole, midwestbowhunter, but these cats are afforded no federal or state protection in Iowa (and Illinois). They are free game if ever encountered in the midwest (pun intended), as sad as that may sound (not sure if they are protected in Missouri though). Sure, the general attitude towards these cats is “shoot first, ask questions later”, so the state (DNR or police) probably would have shot this individual anyhow if the guy reported it and they were successful in finding it again. One can rationalize the killing of the animal, but I disagree with the term “trophy”. It will be a matter of time before some limited state-level protection is extended to cougars in the midwest.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 11:17 AM

Treehugger attacks do not happen all the time.There are on average less than 6 attacks and less than one death due to mountain lions. That is in the whole of the United States AND Canada. Better not ride in a car to go and hunt.

Some people just want to kill stuff.

Posted by illin on 12/16 at 11:21 AM

I think it is the “protection” issue that keeps the DNR from wanting to verify the population.  It would be one more expense added on top of the already tiny budget.  Also, in response to the folks who are afraid, I have been stalked by a mountain lion while backpacking in Idaho.  It wasn’t fun.  It was interesting to see how our group handled the situation and then how we made a safety plan to ensure that we never left the camp alone.  It actually added to our wilderness experience.  We were scared but that is ok.  I don’t think it’s necessary to kill everything that I am afraid of.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 11:32 AM

Treehugger…you should be more concerned about your kids being killed or injured by the horses.  Between 1976 and 1987 there were 205 riding fatalities in 27 states.  If you are admitted to a hospital for any horse related accident, your odds of dying are 6.7%...probably from a head injury.

Personally, I won’t go near a horse because they are too damn dangerous.  I know a good number of people who have suffered serious and yes, life-threatening injuries because of horses. 

So spare me your rational of “protecting your kids and horses” from a virtually non-existent threat.  That dog won’t hunt!

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 11:41 AM

Spoon River - Man up?  And you are afraid to be around horses?  I know lots of kids - some little girls - who are around horses all the time - and even ride them!  My niece is one of them.  So, you proved my point!  We each take into account our odds and decide what we want to chance.  And for the record - I’m with you - I do not like to be around horses either and I think they are dangerous!  Yet, I ride my 4-wheeler like a maniac without a helmet.  Funny what we each fear and do not fear.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 12:45 PM

Gilly, taliban would be an invasive non-native species like feral cats, to be extirpated at will. Cougars on the other hand would be be an appropriate native species to reintroduce, akin to reintroducing elk to the Shawnee.

Posted by Henry Holt on 12/16 at 12:51 PM

So Henry - I’l play along and agree that we introduce them back and DNR regulates them. They only allow a few permits once a population is established.  You walk to your deerstand to deer hunt - you have no cougar permit - and just as you start to go up the tree, you see the pretty little 120 lb cougar looking at you like a rib-eye steak.  You are going to obey the law and not shoot it right?  Big studly Spoon River is going to show how tough he is and will go up and pet it.  Not me - Girly Gilly is going to shoot first and scream like a school-girl!!!  I don’t want these things in IL!!!!

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 01:39 PM

Hey, Gilly, more people are killed by deer every year than cougars.  Maybe you and the insurance companies are on to something…we should wipe out the deer in order to forever eliminate them as a potential hazard to human life.  And, no, I would not climb a tree to pet a Couger, but I would like to give your cute little lap a good scratchin’ behind the ears.

And, hey, Illinoisboner, there’s a difference between what’s legal and what’s right.  Shooting a deer over a feeder is legal in Texas, but that don’t make it right.  Killing bears over bacon grease is legal, but that doesn’t make it ethical.  And shooting a nice 3 year old buck with great potential is legal, but it’s not smart management.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 02:08 PM

Relax Gilly you probably wouldn’t even know if it was looking at you like a steak, they like to ambush their prey, so you probably wouldn’t even see it until it was too late.
..
This guys was incredibly lucky to even see one, most hunts out west for them are done with dogs since they are so elusive.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 02:12 PM

I won’t sugar coat it one bit. I would love to shoot one while out deer hunting. You are less likely to receive the opportunity here than going out west and paying thousands for a guide to point at the top of the tree showing you where to shoot.I feel that it would be more of a challenge to shoot one here than out west if the challenge is what constitutes a trophy to some of you. Congrats to the guy on a once in a life tme trophy. He should now open an outfitter business for Cougars in Iowa. Maybe my luck would change if I set out everyday to hunt Cougars here and hopefully a big whitetail would walk by instead.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 03:27 PM

Its brown its down…

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 08:15 PM

i wld have shot it in a second no problem and id drive aroud with it in the back of my truck for at least a week showing everyone its a giant kitty cat who doesnt want one in the living room its a great convo piece

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 08:51 PM

When it’s chewing on your kids leg call me I’ll come shot it! We had grizzly bears here before to maybe they should come back to!

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/16 at 10:52 PM

“Brad Baker, state conservation officer with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, said the mountain lion weighed about 125 pounds, and although originally thought to be a female, biologists later confirmed that it was a male.  Baker said the condition of the teeth and claws and the lack of markings from ear tags lead him to the conclusion”

Why was there confusion in determining the sex of this animal? I am no biologist but I thought the presence of balls determined that. Was this some cross dressing lion roaming the country looking for someone to accept him for who he is? What would the teeth and claws have to do with verifying that this was a male? Was it the lack of nail polish?

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/17 at 08:52 AM

Peta loves you guys.  You reinforce everything they think about hunters:  Kill everything, leave it lay, or parade it around town so people can see how great a “hunter” you are.  We are the masters of our planet and we will prove it by wiping out all creatures, large or small, for whatever reason..hell, we don’t even need a reason.  Killing a tree’d cougar is pretty tough…probably could have used a slingshot or rock or better yet..just get a chainsaw and the fall would kill it.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/17 at 09:20 AM

Actually PETA loves you. The people that live in fear of them.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/17 at 09:31 AM

Yea, right fear….like cougars.  I respect them and take them very seriously.  They are well funded and organized and I do not give them ammunition i.e. posts to fuel their agenda.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/17 at 09:45 AM

If you shoot one, you had better hope it is not an “Eastern” sub-species…..if so…...jail time baby!

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/17 at 11:46 AM

I think it’d be a cool thing to see a live cougar.  A few years ago there were sightings in my area and we found several tracks that I’m pretty sure were from the cat.  I’m not worried about one attacking me.  Same thing with a bobcat - I don’t think I could shoot one of those either.  I’d rather watch one stalk and kill a rabbit or something.  Call it professional courtesy.  LOL…

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/17 at 12:08 PM

BowHunterDave - the only way to get PETA to “love” or “like” you/us is to give up hunting (and swatting at flies) all together.  Frankly, i don’t live each day hoping to become a friend of PETA.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/17 at 12:19 PM

Wow this is an interesting topic.  First of all, everyone who says let me be, you must not have a child.  I bet if you had your child going to their tree stand or ground blind and they got attacked by a mountain lion or cougar whatever you want to call it, I am sure that your opinion would change about whether or not you would shoot one. Not to mention I would have to problem shooting one and mounting it with a smile on my face.  That is a trophy in my eyes.  So think about things like that before you say “let them be”!!!!!

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/17 at 02:44 PM

Gilly1, You forgot to include:  Pets, fishing, zoos, eating meat/chicken, or any animal products, fur, dairy, ect. ect. ect..don’t know about insects.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/17 at 04:12 PM

The DNR will tell you they have not turned any cougars loose in Iowa. That is true. They didn’t, they hired one perticular driver, who does not work for the Dept. of Natural Resources, to drive around to secluded areas and drop off young healthy cougars (mountain lions).  My sons and I have seen heard, and chased a female on our farm. I live just West of Cumming, Iowa about 4 miles. She now has two young cubs, which are are very healthy. We got within 20’ of the young pair just this last summer when we were out four-wheeling. Very powerful and fast animals I might add, jumping 12’-14’ straight up in a tree. Some day soon I will hunting her or her cubs just to prove how close they have been to Des Moines.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/17 at 10:30 PM

rbbrooks, actually I do have a “brand new” daughter, she’ll be 14 weeks old tomorrow. My first. And she can not wait until spring comes to climb into her backpack and go shed hunting with daddy. And when she gets old enough i hope she has the same passion about the outdoors as her daddy does. I hope she’s lucky enough to see one of these magnificent animals in the wild. I carry a sidearm into the wild whenever I go and if my life was ever threatened I WOULD protect myself. The chances of being attacked are so minimal I’m sure this would never happen. I’ve came across rattlesnakes in my adventures and yet never felt compelled to kill one and I feel much more threatened by them than a cougar. I think the biggest threat this guy felt was that for a few fleeting moments (had he put his bang stick down) he was no longer the biggest baddest thing in the woods.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/18 at 07:25 AM

Jeff, I mean Murdy, is right. Your kids are more likely to suffer serious injury from an accident during the car ride to the places you hunt or from accidentally falling from their treestands than being attacked by a cougar in the field. So should you not take your kids hunting due to those risks? Unless you’ve got a permit for it (which is unlikely to happen in IL) or unless it is a clear act of self defense, live and let live.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/18 at 07:39 AM

this site is about to become jerry springer,iowa law said he could kill this cat,so he did.so why the huge debate?if someone is within the bounds of the laws then there is no problem whether you like it or not.when he’s dead and gone his grandkids will be telling about how their grandpa got attacked by a huge lion and shot it out of mid air. now to check illinois laws to see if i can kill one(legally)

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/18 at 09:28 AM

I would have shot it.. Some say cats are a delicacy.. Evergreen colorado. People living there have had children eaten by mountain lions.. mountain lions usually kill there prey by breaking their necks.. So when you walk under the limb they are lying on they silently drop onto your back grab your neck and good night that is all she wrote.. I am not afraid of things that go bump in the night. Nor do I want large silent cats living living near my livestock..

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/18 at 10:29 AM

Food for thought…. Ted Nugents says the tastiest piece of meat in the world are the backstraps off of a mountain lion!! This was alao confirmed to me by a former boss who lived and hunted them out west.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/18 at 12:54 PM

It was legal and on private land. Maybe when the hunter talked to the landowner he was told to shoot. Perhaps the owner had livestock, young kids, pets he was concerned about and that was his call and since I am his quest I would shoot. Either way it’s a legal kill. About the timbers in northern Wi. And for that matter Mn. I haven’t heard of any human deaths yet but allot of the people in these states are not real happy with them being kept on the E-list and want the numbers to be reduced. Some claim the deer numbers in these areas are suffering, their hunting dogs and hounds are being killed and pets need an armed escort when taken outside. Just read in the forums about the yote attacking the hunting dogs, if that would have been a timber or two that dog wouldn’t have had a chance. So be careful what you wish for when these predators move in, it is a game changer (no pun intended).

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/18 at 02:26 PM

Yes, do what Bass says..go out and kill every living creature…like female deer for example.  It is perfectly legal.  That way we won’t have to worry about car collisions.  This is an issue of ethics and I can see by the posts it (ethics), should be put on the endangered species list.

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 12/18 at 03:33 PM

Page 1 of 2 pages  1 2 > 

Comment Area Pool Rules

  1. Read our Terms of Service.
  2. You must be a member. :: Register here :: Log In
  3. Keep it clean.
  4. Stay on topic.
  5. Be civil, honest and accurate.
  6. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Log In

Register as a new member

Next entry: Iowa ice fishing well underway

Previous entry: Feds to spend $13M to fight Asian carp invasion

Log Out

RSS & Atom Feeds

Prairie State Outdoors
PSO on Facebook
Promote Your Page Too

News Archives

October 2014
S M T W T F S
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31  
Copyright © 2007-2014 GateHouse Media, Inc.
Some Rights Reserved
Original content available for non-commercial use
under a Creative Commons license, except where noted.
Creative Commons